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  • NSSF: Americans Say 'Gun Violence' is Criminal Justice, Not Public Health Issue, National Poll Finds

    NEWTOWN, Conn. - More than eight out of ten Americans say that the misuse of guns in violent crimes is a matter for the criminal justice system, not a public health issue, and that the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) should not spend resources on the study of "gun violence" but instead concentrate on viruses and disease.

    These findings are among the results of a national scientific poll of 1055 likely voters conducted live by telephone Sept. 30-Oct. 2. The National Shooting Sports Foundation (NSSF) commissioned this survey to determine whether adults share the view of some gun control organizations and activists that the use of guns in crime, for which they use the short-hand "gun violence," is a public health issue.

    An overwhelming 84 percent of survey respondents said gun violence is a criminal justice issue, rather than a public health issue, such as viruses. An even higher 88 percent of respondents said they do not think the CDC should spend resources on studying the use of guns in crime rather than on studying viruses and disease. Some 71 percent of respondents said that the federal government should not classify gun violence as a public health issue in the manner of viruses and diseases.

    When asked whether the definition of gun violence should be expanded to include accidents and instances of self-defense, nearly three-quarters of respondents said gun violence is a crime committed using a firearm with the intent to injure another person.

    The survey was conducted by Harper Polling. The margin of error is +/-3.02 percent. Respondents self-identified as 38 percent Democrat, 33 percent Republican and 30 percent independent. As to ethnicity, 74 percent of respondents said they were White, 11 percent African-American, 8 percent Hispanic; and 7 percent, other. As to age, 25 percent of respondents said they were 18-39; 27 percent, 40-54; 23 percent 55-65; and 25 percent, 66 or older.

    "As the significant challenges posed by the Ebola epidemic demonstrate, the emphasis of the Centers for Disease Control should remain on the study, prevention and containment of viruses and infectious disease," said Lawrence G. Keane, NSSF senior vice president and general counsel. "For political reasons, many involved in gun control activism would like to re-define the criminal misuse of guns into a public health issue. We commissioned this survey to help determine where Americans stood on this issue. To put it plainly, they don't buy it. And given the 20-year reduction in violent crime that the FBI reports, even as the number of firearms in the hands of law-abiding citizens has increased, they shouldn't buy it."



  • Op-Ed: The FBI’s bogus report on mass shootings
    by John R. Lott

    It’s disheartening to see the FBI used to promote a political agenda, but that’s what we got with the bureau’s release last month of a study claiming to show a sharp rise in mass shootings, a la Newtown, Conn.

    The FBI counted 160 “mass” or “active” shootings in public places from 2000 to 2013. Worse, it said these attacks rose from just one in 2000 to 17 in 2013. Media outlets worldwide gave the “news” extensive coverage.

    Too bad the study is remarkably shoddy — slicing the evidence to distort the results. In fact, mass public shootings have only risen ever so slightly over the last four decades.

    While the FBI study discusses “mass shootings or killings,” its graphs were filled with cases that had nothing to do with mass killings. Of the 160 cases it counted, 32 involved a gun being fired without anyone being killed. Another 35 cases involved a single murder.

    It’s hard to see how the FBI can count these incidents, which make up 42 percent of its 160 cases, as “mass killings.” They plainly don’t fit the FBI’s old definition, which required four or more murders, nor even its new one of at least three murders.

    And these non-mass shootings, with zero or one person killed, drive much of the purported increase in the number of attacks. If you consider cases where no one or only one person was killed, 50 came in the last seven years of the period the FBI examined and only 17 during the first seven years.

    For example, in 2010, the FBI reports that there were 29 of these active shooter cases, but just nine involved more than a single fatality.

    The FBI study also ignored 20 out of what should have been a total of 113 cases where at least two people were killed.

    For example, it missed a 2001 shooting at a Chicago bar that left two dead and 21 wounded, as well as a 2004 Columbus, Ohio, attack at a concert that left four dead.

    Three-quarters of the missing cases came in the first half of the study’s time period, thus again biasing the results toward finding a larger increase over time.

    Another trick was the choice of 2000 as the starting date. Everybody who has studied these attacks knows that 2000 and 2001 were unusually quiet years, with few mass shootings.

    Thus, by starting with those years and padding the cases in later years with non-mass shooting attacks, the study’s authors knew perfectly well they would get the result they wanted.

    Click here to read the entire article in the New York Post.

     



  • The Well Armed Woman Program - where the feminine and firearms meet
    by Larry S. Moore

    Women are the fastest growing segment of the shooting sports. A recent National Shooting Sports Foundation survey found that 37% of new shooters are female. The 18 to 34 years old age group make up about two-thirds of new shooters. While Ohio doesn't track concealed handgun license numbers by gender, women most certainly comprise a fast growing segment of the licensed concealed carry segment. So it is no surprise that The Well Armed Woman program is growing quickly.

    Becky Bollinger, who started one of the newer Well Armed Woman Chapters, explains, "The Well Armed Woman (WAW) Program is a national organization started by Carrie Lightfoot in Arizona. She saw a need for women to learn about firearms in their environment. Women may be intimidated by men in the class room or on the range. We are often hesitant to speak up. We just don't learn the same way as the guys. She has standardized the leadership requirements. While only two years old now, there are 181 chapters in 42 states with almost 5000 members."

    Bollinger learned about WAW and was aware of chapters in the northern Cincinnati area but nothing closer than an hour or more to drive from her home. Bollinger said, "I thought we have a great facility at the Clinton County Farmers and Sportsmen Association (CCFSA) and that we could attract women from surrounding counties. We have certainly drawn ladies from the surrounding areas. I attended the CCFSA open house in April 2014 armed only with handouts. The creation of a chapter was a dream at that point. I had no idea what the response might be. I had an overwhelmingly positive response. We had our meeting in May and have been meeting monthly since that time. There are currently 26 paid members in the chapter. Fifteen of the ladies have also joined the CCFSA. It is proving to be a win-win for both the WAW program and the CCFSA."

    Women here are growing, learning and perfecting their handgun skills under the watchful eye of veteran shooters and range safety officers. Bollinger noted that quite a few of the woman have come a long way with their shooting skills in a very short period of time. She adds, "Our very first meeting we had several ladies who had never touched a firearm, some who had fired a shotgun but who had never shot a handgun and a couple who are competitive shooters. It really is a very broad spectrum of experience levels. We have been using the NRA Basic Pistol course. Most all have seen their shooting improve with understanding of proper grip, stance and shooting techniques. Some have gotten their concealed handgun licenses."

    Bollinger is especially appreciative of the support received from CCFSA noting, "Everyone has been very supportive of our efforts. The range safety officers and other club volunteers have been super to ensure that the ranges are ready for our meetings. Everything is always ready for us to hang our targets and shoot. The club has been a great supporter of our efforts."

    The ladies took full advantage of the time to practice shooting. It was obvious everyone was having a great time. The range officers commented how impressed they are with this group. They pay very close attention to the safety aspects of shooting. They are focused on their techniques making productive use of their range time to keep the skills sharp and continuing to improve. The chatter around the range tables really isn't any different than what the guys do - with a possible exception of comparison of the various colors of the handguns, holsters and range bags. Even in rural Clinton County at the range, the ladies maintain a sense of fashion awareness!

    Bollinger said, "Most have improved their shooting positions. All maintain a high degree of awareness of safety on the firing line. They control the direction of their muzzle, keep their trigger finger in the proper position when not shooting and safely re-holster their firearm."

    This is a great program for the ladies. It addresses specific questions they have that are different concerns with different viewpoints than the guys. Just in case someone hasn't noticed, the girls are built differently than the guys. They have different fashions which results in different needs if they chose to carry a handgun. They need answers and gear with their gender in mind. The Well Armed Woman provides the information. The ladies exchanging opinions and experiences with each other is a key factor to the success of the program.

    Bollinger noted, "You will see equipment options designed especially with the ladies in mind. The Well Armed Woman Program has thirteen large boxes full of holsters and carry options. These are shipped to chapters for the meetings. The ladies can examine each holster, try them and see how each holster works for their particular situation and build. Holsters are expensive and a critical piece of equipment for concealed carry. One holster may not cover all the situations or options needed for safe concealed carry. Evaluating holsters and getting the one that will work for you is important."

    In addition to the range time there is a meeting to address any chapter business plus have speakers on firearms related topics. This meeting featured Joe Eaton, Buckeye Firearms Regional Leader, who addressed current topics. Eaton presented information about the Buckeye Firearms Association PAC and Foundation. With the election looming large for gun owners, Eaton presented information on the PAC's endorsed candidates, as well as, a legislative update. He spent most of the time explaining the Faculty Administrator Safety Training & Emergency Response program which has trained over 300 teachers and administrators in emergency preparedness at schools. The program is aimed at overall school security, stopping active school shooters and saving lives through emergency training.

    There are currently eight WAW chapters around Ohio. In addition to the Clinton County Chapter meeting at the Clinton County Farmers and Sportsmen Association, there are chapters around Ohio. Complete information can be found on The Well Armed Woman website at: http://www.thewellarmedwoman.com/

    Outdoor writer and hunter education instructor Larry S. Moore is a long-time volunteer leader for Buckeye Firearms Foundation and winner of the 2005 USSA Patriot Award, the 2007 League of Ohio Sportsmen/Ohio Wildlife Federation Hunter Educator of the Year and the 2010 National Wild Turkey Federation/ Women in the Outdoors Hunter Education Instructor of the Year.



  • Armed robber victimizes customer in Kroger bathroom; Bloomberg Moms silent
    by Chad D. Baus

    Hamilton, Ohio's Journal-News is reporting that a man reported being robbed in a bathroom at a Kroger store in Butler County - an incident that is drawing national attention due to claims by Michael Bloomberg's Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America that there is never a need to carry a firearm for self-defense in or near a grocery store.

    From the article:

    A suspect who reportedly robbed a customer at a grocery store here Monday night remains at large.

    The incident was reported around 7:15 p.m. at Kroger Marketplace, 7300 Yankee Road, in the Liberty Commons shopping center, according to the Lt. Morgan Dallman of the Butler County Sheriff’s Office Liberty Twp. substation.

    When the man entered the restroom, another man put what he believed was a gun to the back of his head and demanded money. The man relinquished his wallet to the suspect and the suspect fled the scene.

    The man immediately reported the robbery to police, telling investigators that the subject told him he had a gun, but that he did not get to look at the subject during the robbery.

    “He was afraid to face him given the shock of thinking there was a gun pointing at him,” said Capt. Mike Craft of the sheriff’s office.

    According to BearingArms.com, this is the third violent crime in or near a Kroger in recent weeks, with a teen mob beating a customer and two employees unconscious in Memphis, TN, and a man shooting a robber in self-defense in Kroger parking lot in Indianapolis, Indiana, just miles from the home of Moms Demand Action founder Shannon Watts.

    No business is immune to crime, and this article is certainly not meant to single out Kroger, a Cincinnati-based company which has refused attempts by the Bloomberg Moms group to bully the company into adopting a "no-guns" victim zone policy. But given the media attention the anti-gun rights Moms group is generating about Kroger, people are naturally going to take special note of any crimes that occur in the stores.

    Billionaire Bloomberg's newly-minted gun control groups, which includes the $50 million Moms and Everytown for Gun Safety, aren't getting off to a very good start, especially for groups that, like their predecessor Mayors Against Illegal Guns, didn't start with the grassroots and are simply PR smoke and mirrors.

    At the time it was launched in April, and despite the fact that he can afford to hire the finest public relations experts available, Bloomberg's $50 million "Everytown" campaign forgot to secure a Facebook page - and had to threaten to sue when a Second Amendment supporter created one himself, using it to show what REAL gun safety is.  The page accumulated more than 20,000 fans in just a couple of days, and state-level "off-shoot" pages began popping up all over the country.

    Next, one of the group's board members, former Homeland Security Secretary Tom Ridge, quit the group, citing his discomfort with some of the political work the group was planning.

    Later, the group made headlines when former MAIG boss Mark Glaze admitted to the Wall Street Journal that “it is a messaging problem” for gun control groups like Everytown “when a mass shooting happens and nothing that we have to offer would have stopped that mass shooting.”

    Soon thereafter, the group released a list of 74 supposed school shootings that had occurred since the Sandy Hook massacre in Newtown, Connecticut. It was soon revealed by journalist Charles C. Johnson, however, that not only did some of them not take place on campuses but that “fewer than 7 of the 74 school shootings listed by #Everytown are mass shootings,” that one or more probably didn’t happen at all, that at least one was actually a case of self-defense, and that 32 could be classified as “school shootings” only if, as National Review's Charles C. W. Cooke put it, we are to twist the meaning of the term beyond all recognition.

    Everytown's latest PR boondoggle is a commercial which depicts a woman calling 911 as her ex-husband kicks in the door, grabs her child and puts a gun to her head. The problem for the people in "Everytown" is that almost NO ONE in real towns who watched the commercial came away with the idea that everything would have turned out ok if only the bad guy didn't have a gun. Instead, most viewers - including several panelists on ABC's The View - found themselves wishing that the mother in the commercial DID have a gun.

    Before the Kroger crime incidents, Bloomberg's Moms group suffered a PR blow when, in response to their attempts to intimidate national corporations into discriminating against a large segment of their customer base who carry guns for self-defense, more than 57,000 smaller businesses recognized an opportunity to win over new customers by hanging up the "welcome" signs.  While they have claimed success in cases involving Starbucks, Target, Sonic and Chipotle, the truth is that not one of these corporations have posted "no-guns" signs in response to the Bloomies' efforts.

    Chad D. Baus is the Buckeye Firearms Association Secretary, BFA PAC Vice Chairman, and an NRA-certified firearms instructor. He is the editor of BuckeyeFirearms.org, which received the Outdoor Writers of Ohio 2013 Supporting Member Award for Best Website.



  • NSSF Poll: Americans Would Rather CDC Spend Time and Resources on Disease and Viruses such as Ebola, Not 'Gun Violence' Studies

    NEWTOWN, Conn. — More than eight out of ten Americans say that the misuse of guns in violent crimes is a matter for the criminal justice system, not a public health issue, and that the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) should not spend resources on the study of “gun violence” but instead concentrate on viruses and disease.

    These findings are among the results of a national scientific poll of 1055 likely voters conducted live by telephone Sept. 30-Oct. 2. The National Shooting Sports Foundation (NSSF) commissioned this survey to determine whether adults share the view of some gun control organizations and activists that the use of guns in crime, for which they use the short-hand “gun violence,” is a public health issue.

    An overwhelming 84 percent of survey respondents said gun violence is a criminal justice issue, rather than a public health issue, such as viruses. An even higher 88 percent of respondents said they do not think the CDC should spend resources on studying the use of guns in crime rather than on studying viruses and disease. Some 71 percent of respondents said that the federal government should not classify gun violence as a public health issue in the manner of viruses and diseases.

    When asked whether the definition of gun violence should be expanded to include accidents and instances of self-defense, nearly three-quarters of respondents said gun violence is a crime committed using a firearm with the intent to injure another person.

    The survey was conducted by Harper Polling. The margin of error is +/-3.02 percent. Respondents self-identified as 38 percent Democrat, 33 percent Republican and 30 percent independent. As to ethnicity, 74 percent of respondents said they were White, 11 percent African-American, 8 percent Hispanic; and 7 percent, other. As to age, 25 percent of respondents said they were 18-39; 27 percent, 40-54; 23 percent 55-65; and 25 percent, 66 or older.

    “As the significant challenges posed by the Ebola epidemic demonstrate, the emphasis of the Centers for Disease Control should remain on the study, prevention and containment of viruses and infectious disease,” said Lawrence G. Keane, NSSF senior vice president and general counsel. “For political reasons, many involved in gun control activism would like to re-define the criminal misuse of guns into a public health issue. We commissioned this survey to help determine where Americans stood on this issue. To put it plainly, they don’t buy it. And given the 20-year reduction in violent crime that the FBI reports, even as the number of firearms in the hands of law-abiding citizens has increased, they shouldn’t buy it.”

     



  • Sean Maloney will be on NRA’s Board of Directors Ballot

    Sean MaloneyBuckeye Firearms Association is pleased to announce that Sean Maloney will appear on the ballot as a candidate for the 2015 NRA Board of Directors!

    "Together we did it," Sean observes. "Thank you to the thousands of people who took the time to sign my petitions and succeeded in having my name appear on the ballot for election to the 2015 NRA Board of Directors. Your signatures, letters, cards, and notes of encouragement mean the world to me. We are each dedicated in this fight for freedom in our own way. My election to the NRA Board of Directors will be an important milestone in my fight, and together we will win."

    What's next? NRA voting members, Life Members and above, or an NRA Member who has been an Annual Member for five consecutive years will receive an NRA Board of Director’s ballot in the NRA magazine in early 2015 (or by mail if you get an electronic copy of the magazine). Please select Sean Maloney as one of your preferred choices.

    Sean Maloney is a Legislative Director of Buckeye Firearms Association, a Second Amendment Rights attorney in West Chester, OH, an NRA Benefactor Life Member, NRA Election Volunteer Coordinator for Ohio's 8th Congressional District, an active NRA Instructor, serves on the "Grassroots Development" committee of the National Rifle Association and received the NRA's 2010 NRA-ILA “Jay M. Littlefield Memorial Volunteer of the Year Award;" 2011 Inductee NRA-ILA “Election Volunteer Coordinator Hall of Fame;” 2013 Friends of the NRA “Area Volunteer of the year, Southern Ohio.”

    To learn more about Sean and his stance on the Second Amendment, click here, and please visit www.maloneyfornra.com.



  • Cleveland man brings pretend gun to knife fight...and wins
    by Chad D. Baus

    The Cleveland Plain Dealer reported recently that a man staved off a drunken, knife-wielding attacker by pretending that he was reaching for a gun.

    From the article:

    A 33-year-old man pulled into his St. Mark Avenue driveway about 2 a.m. Thursday. A 32-year-old man, later identified as Rayshawn Scott, walked briskly up to his window with his hands behind his back.

    "What's up now!" Scott said, swinging his hands around to reveal an eight-and-a-half inch butcher knife, according to the report.

    As Scott moved the knife toward the driver's face, the driver reached into his waistband as if he was pulling out a gun, hoping to scare the man off, according to police.

    Scott lowered the knife and ran into an idling Ford Taurus and drove away. When police officers arrived, they found Scott sitting in the Taurus on a lawn of the house directly across the street.

    The knife lay on the passenger seat of the running car, the report said. Police arrested Scott. He is charged with driving under suspension, driving while intoxicated and driving on a sidewalk or lawn.

    According to the article, police also referred the victim to city prosecutors to press possible menacing charges.

    The report also notes that records show Scott, who lives near the victim on Bosworth Road, was indicted on burglary, attempted murder, felonious assault and domestic violence charges in 2010. He eventually pleaded to felonious assault and domestic violence, and served two years in prison.

    According to a study commissioned by Attorney General Mike DeWine in 2012, 1 percent of Ohio’s adult prison population since 1974 is responsible for 57 percent of the state’s violent felony convictions. The findings prompted DeWine to call for legislation, dubbed the Violent Career Criminal Act, that would keep such felons behind bars much longer.

    The legislation, Sen. Jim Highes' (R) Senate Bill 121, calls for a mandatory 11-year prison sentence for those convicted of illegally possessing a gun, if they have previously been convicted of two or more violent felonies. Currently, a felon convicted of illegally possessing a firearm faces only one to five years imprisonment.

    Unfortunately, the Ohio Senate has failed to act on the bill. If legislators do not act, SB 121 will die at the end of December, along with many pro-gun bills that are pending.

    If you want to see the General Assembly act to cramp down on criminals, as well as to improve gun rights in ways that are already enjoyed by the majority of other states, call your Representative and Senator NOW and ask them when pro-gun legislation is going to move in Ohio. They want your vote in November. Tell them we want their votes too.

    Chad D. Baus is the Buckeye Firearms Association Secretary, BFA PAC Vice Chairman, and an NRA-certified firearms instructor. He is the editor of BuckeyeFirearms.org, which received the Outdoor Writers of Ohio 2013 Supporting Member Award for Best Website.



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